Rickenbacker late 1950’s and early 1960’s break down

During the late 1950s to early 1960s, Rickenbacker produced several notable electric guitar models that have become highly regarded and sought after by musicians and collectors. Here is a list of some of the key models from that era along with their specifications:

  1. Rickenbacker 325: The 325 model gained fame as the guitar played by John Lennon of The Beatles. It featured a small, symmetrical, double-cutaway body, a 20-fret neck with a rosewood fingerboard, and three “Toaster” single-coil pickups. The guitar had a shorter scale length of 20.75 inches (527 mm) and a distinctive “R” tailpiece.
  2. Rickenbacker 330: The 330 was a semi-hollow body guitar with a double-cutaway design. It had a maple body with a bound body top, back, and fingerboard. The 24-fret neck had a rosewood fingerboard, and it came with either two or three “Toaster” pickups. The 330 model was highly versatile and had a warm, distinctive tone.
  3. Rickenbacker 335: Similar to the 330, the 335 model had a semi-hollow body, but with a single-cutaway design. It featured a 24-fret neck with a bound rosewood fingerboard and either two or three “Toaster” pickups. The 335 offered a broader range of tones compared to the fully hollow 330.
  4. Rickenbacker 360: The 360 was a full-bodied, semi-hollow guitar with a double-cutaway design. It had a 24-fret neck with a bound rosewood fingerboard and two or three “Toaster” pickups. The 360 offered a unique blend of acoustic resonance and electric versatility.
  5. Rickenbacker 4001: The 4001 was a solid-body bass guitar model that gained popularity among bassists of the era. It featured a distinctive “cresting wave” body shape, a 20-fret neck with a bound rosewood fingerboard, and two single-coil pickups. The 4001 was known for its deep, punchy tone and excellent sustain.
  6. Rickenbacker 450: The 450 was a solid-body guitar with a unique “Cresting Wave” body shape and a single-cutaway design. It had a 24-fret neck with a bound rosewood fingerboard and three “Hi-Gain” single-coil pickups. The 450 provided a wide tonal range and was particularly suited for rock and blues.
  7. Rickenbacker 620: Introduced in the late 1960s, the 620 model retained the classic Rickenbacker aesthetic. It had a semi-hollow body with a double-cutaway design, a 21-fret neck with a bound rosewood fingerboard, and two “Hi-Gain” single-coil pickups. The 620 offered enhanced sustain and a brighter, cutting tone.

Please note that specifications and features may vary between different models and years of production. It’s always recommended to consult specific catalogs or reference materials from that era for precise details on each model.

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